Keeping children safe online

27th February 2015

Many thanks to those parents who attended the E-safety workshop last night. There were some crucial messages put across that made everyone in the audience question not only how their children use the internet on their devices but the adults as well. It was useful to find out which online games and APPs are safe for children to use.
Can you please make sure your child is only accessing age appropriate games…we were shocked by what we found out about one game in particular. A current survey showed that some of our children are accessing inappropriate age related games.
 

Whatever social networks your children are using, learn how to make a report, report someone, or how to block someone if they are being nasty or hurtful.

Online life is an integral part of a child or young person’s real life. Talk to them about their online life in the same way you talk to them about their real life. Let them know that you trust them, and that they can come and talk to you about anything they have seen or heard. Resilience is important; understand that people can say something that appears nasty, but it isn’t meant that way.

If you have any concerns about your children online please speak to any of the following people in school.

Senior Designated Officer – Mrs Melanie Smallwood

Deputy Designated  Officer – Mrs Karen Lintin

Designated Governor – 

Senco – Mrs Donna Clark

pdf Child Protection Policy             pdf Safeguarding Policy

 

Whatever social networks your children are using, learn how to make a report, report someone, or how to block someone if they are being nasty or hurtful.

Online life is an integral part of a child or young person’s real life. Talk to them about their online life in the same way you talk to them about their real life. Let them know that you trust them, and that they can come and talk to you about anything they have seen or heard. Resilience is important; understand that people can say something that appears nasty, but it isn’t meant that way.

Useful websites for parents

Lots of information for parents –

 Lots of information for parents at CEOP –

Guide for parents and carers on the social networks your children may use from O2 and NSPCC -

Making a report to CEOP –

 Making a report to IWF –

 Making a report to Twitter –

Making a report to Instagram

 

Setting Boundaries

Rules are an important part of life and one of the few things we will never escape. Before our child goes online it is crucial that we set some simple and clear rules for them to follow.

Agree time limits

How long can they play for before they need to take a break? On some consoles and laptops this can be enforced through parental controls, only allowing them a certain amount of playing time before it will lock them out. An hour then a break would be perfect for children, even though they will probably disagree!

Talk about sharing

While adults understand the importance of keeping personal information private, do our children know what can and what shouldn’t be shared online? Draw up a list with your child showing what they can’t share online and keep it somewhere that they can easily see it. It’s also important to encourage them to check with you if they’re unsure

Agree on sites they can visit

Make sure you check out new websites that your child mentions – children will always share what they do for fun online with each other but that doesn’t always make the sites appropriate. Parental controls offer the ability to store a list of sites visited, even if you choose not to filter them, so you know where your son or daughter is going online.

Ask who they talk to online

How do they know them? It might be a good time to remind them about strangers online and to discuss what a friend is.

When things go wrong

Encourage them to be open when things go wrong online. Children worry that we will stop them using technology if something bad happens, so it’s important we talk through issues and remember the positives rather than focusing on a few bad apples. Make sure they know that there are other places and people they can go to for advice; aunties and uncles; grandma and grandad; websites such as Childline and CyberMentors can offer anonymous support and allow them to discuss the issues they are experiencing.

Go through the rules

Any site where you can communicate with others also has rules it expects users to follow to keep the experience positive. Make sure your child knows what they can and can’t do,  and also where to report users who break those rules.

Blocking

This is an incredibly important protective feature offered by most sites. Clicking this button can stop another user from contacting your child through the site – a perfect way for your child to manage their own safety. Once they have shown you where it is, make sure they know how to use it.

Don’t forget about consoles, tablets and mobile phones. These all have games and apps which allow your child to connect to other people. Should any of these be kept in bedrooms at night?

Worried about YouTube and Google searches? Both sites come with safety features (called Safe Search on Google and Safety on YouTube) to reduce the risk of your child coming across anything inappropriate, accidentally or on purpose!

Helping you get the message across

If children are going online, it’s never too soon for them to learn some simple safety tips to help them. There are a number of resources which parents can use to educate kids about online risk and, more importantly, what to do when things go wrong.

Smartie the Penguin is a short story for younger children about the importance of asking for help if they get stuck online. It also has a song you can sing together to help them remember the most important top tip – telling a trusted adult if confused, worried or scared.

Digi Duck focuses on thinking of the consequences before you post. A great book for primary age children, Digi Duck learns first hand the harm that friends can sometimes do when they post embarrassing pictures of others on the internet.

 

Bishops Tawton Primary School, School Lane, Barnstaple, Devon, EX32 0AE

Telephone: 01271 343002 Email: admin@bishopstawton-primary.org

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